Discussion:
About Tea and the Russian Soldier 1878
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Tim W
2011-05-08 14:50:47 UTC
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From: [1878] Corson, Juliet - Twenty-Five Cent Meals for Families of Six

We donot know of any pleasanter accessory to a meal than a cup of good tea
or coffee.

The physiological action of very strong tea is marked; moderately used it
excites the action of the skin, lungs, and nervous system, and soothes any
undue action of the heart; used to excess, it causes indigestion,
nervousness, and wakefulness. No doubt its effects are greatly modified by
climate, for the Russians drink enormous quantities of very strong, fine
tea. A recent war report gives the following account of its use in the army.

"The Russian soldiers are said to live and fight almost wholly upon tea. The
Cossacks often carry it about in the shape of bricks, or rather tiles,
which, before hardening, are soaked in sheep's blood and boiled in milk,
with the addition of flour, butter and salt, so as to constitute a kind of
soup. The passion of the Russian for this beverage is simply astonishing. In
the depth ofwinter he will empty twenty cups in succession, at nearly
boiling point, until he perspires at every pore, and then, in a state of
excitement rush out, roll in the snow, getup and go on to the next similar
place of entertainment. So with all the army. With every group or circle of
tents travels the invariable tea kettle, suspended from a tripod; and it
would be in vain to think of computing how many times each soldier's
pannikin is filled upon a halt. It is his first idea. Frequently he carries
it cold in a copper case as a solace upon the march."

Dr. Edward Smith sums up the physiological action of tea as follows:

"1 A sense of wakefulness.

"2 Clearness of mind, and activity of thought and imagination.

"3 Increased disposition to make muscular exertion.

"4 Reaction, with a sense of exhaustion in the morning following the
preceding efforts, and in proportion to them.
Jean B.
2011-05-14 02:53:57 UTC
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Post by Tim W
From: [1878] Corson, Juliet - Twenty-Five Cent Meals for Families of Six
We donot know of any pleasanter accessory to a meal than a cup of good tea
or coffee.
The physiological action of very strong tea is marked; moderately used it
excites the action of the skin, lungs, and nervous system, and soothes any
undue action of the heart; used to excess, it causes indigestion,
nervousness, and wakefulness. No doubt its effects are greatly modified by
climate, for the Russians drink enormous quantities of very strong, fine
tea. A recent war report gives the following account of its use in the army.
"The Russian soldiers are said to live and fight almost wholly upon tea. The
Cossacks often carry it about in the shape of bricks, or rather tiles,
which, before hardening, are soaked in sheep's blood and boiled in milk,
with the addition of flour, butter and salt, so as to constitute a kind of
soup. The passion of the Russian for this beverage is simply astonishing. In
the depth ofwinter he will empty twenty cups in succession, at nearly
boiling point, until he perspires at every pore, and then, in a state of
excitement rush out, roll in the snow, getup and go on to the next similar
place of entertainment. So with all the army. With every group or circle of
tents travels the invariable tea kettle, suspended from a tripod; and it
would be in vain to think of computing how many times each soldier's
pannikin is filled upon a halt. It is his first idea. Frequently he carries
it cold in a copper case as a solace upon the march."
"1 A sense of wakefulness.
"2 Clearness of mind, and activity of thought and imagination.
"3 Increased disposition to make muscular exertion.
"4 Reaction, with a sense of exhaustion in the morning following the
preceding efforts, and in proportion to them.
These tidbits are so interesting. Much of Corson's output has
become rather fragile (and is probably therefore somewhat hard to
find). It is kind-of like old newsprint.

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