Discussion:
Tape that cabbage
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Opinicus
2011-05-04 05:19:50 UTC
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In Elizabeth David's "French Country Cooking" (published in 1951)
there are several recipes for stuffed whole cabbage. In this
technique, a whole cabbage is blanched then "you proceed to unfold the
cabbage leaf by leaf, gently, until it looks like an open flower." The
stuffing mixture is spread on each leaf, after which "when all the
stuffing is used up, press the leaves of the cabbage gently together
and tie it into its original shape with tape." The stuffed cabbage is
usually cooked in a very slow oven for several hours. Finally "when
the cabbage is cooked, [you] take the tape away very carefully."

What sort of "tape" could they have used for cooking purposes in early
1950s Britain?
--
Bob
http://www.kanyak.com
Tim W
2011-05-04 07:38:53 UTC
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Post by Opinicus
In Elizabeth David's "French Country Cooking" (published in 1951)
there are several recipes for stuffed whole cabbage. In this
technique, a whole cabbage is blanched then "you proceed to unfold the
cabbage leaf by leaf, gently, until it looks like an open flower." The
stuffing mixture is spread on each leaf, after which "when all the
stuffing is used up, press the leaves of the cabbage gently together
and tie it into its original shape with tape." The stuffed cabbage is
usually cooked in a very slow oven for several hours. Finally "when
the cabbage is cooked, [you] take the tape away very carefully."
What sort of "tape" could they have used for cooking purposes in early
1950s Britain?
I would presume that pre sellotape the word would mean a non glued woven
cotton tape. The sort of thing you would use for tying on bonnets or
strengthening hems.

Tim W
Jim Elbrecht
2011-05-04 12:03:35 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 May 2011 08:19:50 +0300, Opinicus
Post by Opinicus
In Elizabeth David's "French Country Cooking" (published in 1951)
there are several recipes for stuffed whole cabbage. In this
technique, a whole cabbage is blanched then "you proceed to unfold the
cabbage leaf by leaf, gently, until it looks like an open flower." The
stuffing mixture is spread on each leaf, after which "when all the
stuffing is used up, press the leaves of the cabbage gently together
and tie it into its original shape with tape." The stuffed cabbage is
usually cooked in a very slow oven for several hours. Finally "when
the cabbage is cooked, [you] take the tape away very carefully."
What sort of "tape" could they have used for cooking purposes in early
1950s Britain?
Sounds like an interesting recipe. Any pictures of the end product?
My guess is that they were using [or you could use] cotton ribbon. A
string would pull through the leaves as they softened.

Jim
Tim W
2011-05-04 22:19:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Wed, 04 May 2011 08:19:50 +0300, Opinicus
Post by Opinicus
In Elizabeth David's "French Country Cooking" (published in 1951)
there are several recipes for stuffed whole cabbage. In this
technique, a whole cabbage is blanched then "you proceed to unfold the
cabbage leaf by leaf, gently, until it looks like an open flower." The
stuffing mixture is spread on each leaf, after which "when all the
stuffing is used up, press the leaves of the cabbage gently together
and tie it into its original shape with tape." The stuffed cabbage is
usually cooked in a very slow oven for several hours. Finally "when
the cabbage is cooked, [you] take the tape away very carefully."
What sort of "tape" could they have used for cooking purposes in early
1950s Britain?
Sounds like an interesting recipe. Any pictures of the end product?
My guess is that they were using [or you could use] cotton ribbon. A
string would pull through the leaves as they softened.
Yes indeed interesting. I had a look in Jane Grigson and she has several
pages of variations of Chou Farci as you describe. She says to tie it up
with string, maybe placing some straps of foil under it for lifting it out
of the pan or to use a basket or alternatively recommends wrapping the whole
cabbage in muslin er, an old nappy actually.

Tim W
Jerry Avins
2011-05-04 14:53:02 UTC
Permalink
On May 4, 1:04 am, Opinicus <***@spamcop.net.which.is.not.invalid>
wrote:

...
Post by Opinicus
What sort of "tape" could they have used for cooking purposes in early
1950s Britain?
White cotton, of the type used as edge binding or to make piping. The
usual cotton butcher's twine would cut through the soft leaves. Tape
spreads the pressure. The ends are simply knotted.

Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
Arri London
2011-05-29 22:49:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Opinicus
In Elizabeth David's "French Country Cooking" (published in 1951)
there are several recipes for stuffed whole cabbage. In this
technique, a whole cabbage is blanched then "you proceed to unfold the
cabbage leaf by leaf, gently, until it looks like an open flower." The
stuffing mixture is spread on each leaf, after which "when all the
stuffing is used up, press the leaves of the cabbage gently together
and tie it into its original shape with tape." The stuffed cabbage is
usually cooked in a very slow oven for several hours. Finally "when
the cabbage is cooked, [you] take the tape away very carefully."
What sort of "tape" could they have used for cooking purposes in early
1950s Britain?
Cotton twill tape, used for many sewing purposes.

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