Discussion:
an interesting egg substitute
(too old to reply)
Jean B.
2010-04-26 17:38:17 UTC
Permalink
Another gleaning as I go through some recent acquisitions, this
time Ransom's Family Receipt Book 1884, p. 23.

"Snow as a substitute for eggs.--In making pancakes or puddings,
snow is an excellent substitute for eggs; two tablespoonfuls of
snow stirred in quickly are equal to an egg in puddings or
pancakes for making them light. It is explained by the fact that
snow contains in the flakes much atmospheric air, which is set
free as it melts."

I have not seen this suggestion before. It makes SOME sense, but
then this would seem to be more watery than egg when cooked....
--
Jean B.
j***@sorosetanic.com
2010-04-30 22:06:30 UTC
Permalink
Sounds like pure fantasy to me.

Anyway, you'd be better off getting a straw and blowing bubbles into
the batter.

You are going to cook the pancake. So you are not going to infect the
eaters.
Post by Jean B.
Another gleaning as I go through some recent acquisitions, this
time Ransom's Family Receipt Book 1884, p. 23.
"Snow as a substitute for eggs.--In making pancakes or puddings,
snow is an excellent substitute for eggs; two tablespoonfuls of
snow stirred in quickly are equal to an egg in puddings or
pancakes for making them light. It is explained by the fact that
snow contains in the flakes much atmospheric air, which is set
free as it melts."
I have not seen this suggestion before. It makes SOME sense, but
then this would seem to be more watery than egg when cooked....
Jean B.
2010-05-07 02:14:33 UTC
Permalink
It does sound pretty darned odd! By the time there is snow here
in New England, I will have forgotten all about this--and that is
probably just as well.

--
Jean B.
Post by j***@sorosetanic.com
Sounds like pure fantasy to me.
Anyway, you'd be better off getting a straw and blowing bubbles into
the batter.
You are going to cook the pancake. So you are not going to infect the
eaters.
Post by Jean B.
Another gleaning as I go through some recent acquisitions, this
time Ransom's Family Receipt Book 1884, p. 23.
"Snow as a substitute for eggs.--In making pancakes or puddings,
snow is an excellent substitute for eggs; two tablespoonfuls of
snow stirred in quickly are equal to an egg in puddings or
pancakes for making them light. It is explained by the fact that
snow contains in the flakes much atmospheric air, which is set
free as it melts."
I have not seen this suggestion before. It makes SOME sense, but
then this would seem to be more watery than egg when cooked....
Par
2010-05-26 06:45:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jean B.
Another gleaning as I go through some recent acquisitions, this
time Ransom's Family Receipt Book 1884, p. 23.
"Snow as a substitute for eggs.--In making pancakes or puddings,
snow is an excellent substitute for eggs; two tablespoonfuls of
snow stirred in quickly are equal to an egg in puddings or
pancakes for making them light. It is explained by the fact that
snow contains in the flakes much atmospheric air, which is set
free as it melts."
I have not seen this suggestion before. It makes SOME sense, but
then this would seem to be more watery than egg when cooked....
It is (make that "was"; the instructions on the carton says nothing
about snow...) used sometimes as a substitute for whisked egg-whites in
some styles of waffles over here in Sweden. The idea is that fresh,
fluffy snow folded in will trap air the same way. I've tried it, and it
sort of works.

So, fresh, cold fluffy snow instead of egg-whites.

/Par
--
Par ***@hunter-gatherer.org
Because if you've put yourself in a position where someone has
to see you in order for you to be safe -- to see you, and to
give a fuck -- you've already blown it. -- Neal Stephenson, 'Zodiac'.
Jean B.
2010-06-11 14:37:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Par
Post by Jean B.
Another gleaning as I go through some recent acquisitions, this
time Ransom's Family Receipt Book 1884, p. 23.
"Snow as a substitute for eggs.--In making pancakes or puddings,
snow is an excellent substitute for eggs; two tablespoonfuls of
snow stirred in quickly are equal to an egg in puddings or
pancakes for making them light. It is explained by the fact that
snow contains in the flakes much atmospheric air, which is set
free as it melts."
I have not seen this suggestion before. It makes SOME sense, but
then this would seem to be more watery than egg when cooked....
It is (make that "was"; the instructions on the carton says nothing
about snow...) used sometimes as a substitute for whisked egg-whites in
some styles of waffles over here in Sweden. The idea is that fresh,
fluffy snow folded in will trap air the same way. I've tried it, and it
sort of works.
So, fresh, cold fluffy snow instead of egg-whites.
/Par
Late reply. How interesting, Par. So this is worth a try--if one
can get pristine snow.
--
Jean B.
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